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Design Ideas for Labor Day

Labor Day might be a holiday to honor the men and women of America for all their hard work, but that doesn’t mean there’s any shortage of it for graphic designers. Many businesses try to capitalize on holiday spirit and festive moods through brochure printing, postcard printing and other direct-marketing methods.

Labor Day is no exception, so consider the following Labor Day graphic design ideas and concepts to make your promotional designs work for you:

Tone

You only have a split second to grab attention, so set the tone for your Labor Day postcards and brochures immediately. Do your clients have a great one-time offer or are they seeking to increase brand recognition by identifying with working America? A hardware store, for example, might be liquidating their stock of outdoor furniture in one day, while an investment firm might send a postcard reminding clients that even though most of the country has the day off, their investments are still working for them.

Colors

Labor Day is a patriotic holiday, and as such many designers incorporate the traditional red, white and blue into their designs. That doesn’t mean you have to stick with these colors; rather, you can try a fall color scheme with oranges, reds and browns. Alternatively, you could go with a clean and crisp blue and green motif to represent the fresh air of the great outdoors as the weather cools this time of year.

No matter what colors you use, try varying shades and hues for a layered effect that pops off the paper its printed on; or you could experiment with contrasting one theme against another to see if you find something that’s truly visually stunning.

Shapes and icons

Know your audience and try shapes and icons that best represent them. Machinery, hard hats, tools and smokestacks, for example, would be well-placed in postcards, brochures, flyers and catalogs targeting factory workers, while computers, skyscrapers and pencils might be best suited for the office crowd.

If you have a highly targeted audience such as dentists, lawyers, miners or steelworkers, you can find career-specific shapes and icons. For a more generalized approach, try to incorporate circles, triangles, rectangles and other overlapping shapes in the background to add some spice to your Labor Day designs.

History and tradition

Do a little research to find some historical facts you can relate to your target audience. The women who worked in industry during World War II, for instance, provide plenty of inspiration for promotions aimed at women. Alternatively, you could draw on popular media with a “whistle while you work” theme.

The ideas and concepts mentioned above should get your creative juices flowing. Now you can come up with your own original designs for a robust return on investment that keeps you working – or at least, in business – for years to come.

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