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Unique New Year’s Holiday Design Ideas

New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day present excellent marketing opportunities, particularly for companies who can tout their product as a new beginning worthy of a resolution. New Year’s holiday advertising has to be spectacular, however, if it is to earn sales in the aftermath of that dollar-draining holiday called Christmas.

Try these unique New Year’s holiday design ideas to get the ball rolling after the ball drops this year:

Fireworks and champagne

Traditional New Year’s holiday symbols are design mainstays, but you can make your designs stand out by brainstorming creative ways to represent these concepts with relevancy to your business. A ball drops in Times Square at midnight; but it’s an orange in Florida. See if you can come up with a similar motif. A potato chip company’s coupon postcards might depict fireworks exploding out of a corn chip bag, for example, or the space between two champagne glasses might form the elegant silhouette of a woman for a fashion boutique.

New beginnings

You’ve probably seen the political cartoons that depict an elderly Father Time passing the torch to a newborn on New Year’s Day. You can incorporate the same theme into your postcards, posters and brochures – especially if you’re undergoing a re-brand or image update to coincide with the new Year. Keep in mind that you don’t need to stick with old man-to-newborn baby imagery. Try to look for new ways to represent this concept, whether it’s through the animal kingdom, a fresh coat of paint, or a revolutionary agenda. At the core of your message might be the wonder that the future has in store for your customers.

The resolution

New Year’s resolutions are in high fashion around the first of January, but most have lost their luster by February. Now is the time to capitalize on long-term goals and how you can help your customers achieve them. Investment firms, weight loss and fitness centers, psychologists, and other businesses that represent metamorphosis should be prime advertisers this time of year. As a graphic designer, you can visually connect with your audience by demonstrating this change through the progression of a caterpillar to a butterfly, an ugly duckling to a swan, or a humorous chimpanzee to a human.

You can also represent change by equating resolution to revolution. Consider notable moments in history, such as the Revolutionary War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Industrial Revolution for inspiration.

No matter how you design your marketing materials, keep in mind that the quality of the finished piece is a direct reflection on the quality of your products and services. Print your flyers, posters, postcards, brochures, banners and other promotions on high-quality papers from a state-of-the-art printing company for best results and maximum return on investment.

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